Sunday, October 08, 2017

Best Year Ever

As we enter 4th quarter of 2017 my business numbers make me smile. Having worked as a speaker, facilitator, and master of ceremonies for 8 years, this is the year I want to replicate. I have worked with the most amazing clients, earned a great income, and have grown as a person.

I have always had the potential to get my business working as it is this year, but there have always been something holding me back.  My work on "The Paradox of Potential" has oddly been part of the reason that I am accomplishing more this year. Asking so many questions of others about the gap between their potential and results, and seeking for their answers on how to bridge that gap, is leaving me inspired in countless ways.

This year I have operated with more intention. This has had a huge impact and has overlapped with my goal of making ages 50 -75 the best years of my life. 

If someone asked me for advice on how to cultivate their own path across the gap, here are the 10 steps:    
1.      Take ownership of your life 2.      Set clear goals 3.      Work past the fear                                            4.      Connect with people  5.      Be aggressive with gratitude  6.      Deliver on all projects                            7.      Accept that change happens 8.      Ask for help and delegate 9.      Try new things                          10.   Believe in yourself 
 In seeking your own potential, you need to find your intention.  If you need help, join the Potential Mastermind Group (so some other group) and get around people who are there to assist you in finding your best year ever.

Have A Great Day

thom singer

Sunday, October 01, 2017

10 Steps Toward Your Potential (1 of 10)

"The Paradox of Potential"

#1 - Take Ownership of Your Life

There are many reasons that we are where we are in our personal and professional journeys.  The past is the past, and we each had to navigate many good and bad experiences to get here today.  

Finger pointing is a common pass time and it holds us back from moving closer to our own potential.  In my discussions with people at all stages of their careers, the ones who are struggling the most are quick to place the blame on someone or something.  

In my own career path I have had some highs and some lows.  If I desire to take credit for when my hard work and ingenuity paid off, I also have to take ownership of the low times. While there were always other people involved in the ups and the downs, the once constant was me.  

If you are not feeling positive about your current gap between your potential and your results, grab hold of everything that has ever happened to you and let go of the blame.  Do not blame yourself, but also do not blame others.  You are where you are and that is a great place to start.  

You are the architect of everything that happens from this day forward. You do not need to ask for permission from anyone else to make changes.  Take ownership, but with that you must take 100% of the responsibility.

Personally I have struggled with doing this, as I worry that if I fail all the fingers will be pointing at me.  Yet once I learned that I must be in control if I want the levels of success that I desire, then I am willing to take my chances as the one in charge of my life.

Have A Great Day.

thom singer

Monday, September 04, 2017

The Journey Toward Your Potential

It is frustrating when you know you or your team has potential, but the bottom line is not showing results. Many people find themselves spinning their wheels with a desire to achieve more but they are simply not finding all their success.

There is a paradox around potential.  Often when a company hires a new person they get excited about their expectations about that individual's pending contribution, only to wonder later how they missed the mark. But potential does not equal results.  There are so many other parts that are often overlooked, and it has become my passion to get people focused on how to bridge  that gap.

Human resource professionals have all sorts of personality and skills tests, but they do not always predict outcomes.  Some managers trust their gut instincts, only to later question their own methods. But this is not just about individuals, whole teams can get caught in the chasm can continuously come up short from their desired possibilities. 

In a survey now consisting of over 250 people I have found that 70% of the people feel either they or their companies are not doing all they can in this area of reaching potential. Of those who feel they are reaching all they can, I am not sure if all the participants are being honest with themselves about all they can achieve. Some are clearly comfortable where they are, but when I speak with them it is clear they do not have stretch goals.

Not that goals are the magic bullet.  Many with goals are always missing the mark. Yet, I am learning that your potential is never really the entire destination, as you move a long your path you keep learning and growing and this brings about greater potential.  Each time you get close the prize of potential moves farther out.

The paradox of potential is all about how meaningless potential is without the actions.  It is common to assume potential has meaning, but alone it is just another label we are assigned or self-proclaim. If you take pride in potential without results there is not really anything there. 

It is not about building a bridge you your potential, but rather a scaffolding. You move across and can always add on and take a lateral path or go up and down.  Even diagonal. 

If you seek to go after success all alone you might get there, but when you share the efforts with others you will often get there faster. Potential that is recognized by the people around you is often more realistic and achievable. Consistent analysis and conversation with trusted peers will help you get closer to your best. 

My own business has grown since I made the study of my potential a daily effort.  The honest dissection of past mistakes and missed goals, and openly sharing with peers has allowed me to expand my sales by over 50%. This cannot be a coincidence. I had previously gotten caught up in the dream of my potential for success, but was not focused on the small actions that would take me where I longed to go. 

Those who want to push forward toward reaching more potential cannot be scared to have many discussions with co-workers, vendors, customers, etc...  Wishing for better results will not make them happen.  Stripping away facade of potential and getting real is the key to success.

I am currently seeking more people to take this short survey.  It will only take a few moments, but it will continue to allow me to better understand how people wrestle with their own journey toward their potential.  www.SurveyMonkey.com/r/potential1234

Have A Great Day

thom singer

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Recession Proof Your Career by Choosing People

My career as a speaker was built during the "Great Recession".  Before the crash I was advised that if my desire to be a professional speaker was real, I should change topics, as teaching people how to engage, network, build connections, etc... was "fluffy and nobody would pay" for that topic.

Enter 2008 and 2009.  The economy plummeted and people were being laid in near record numbers. Business professionals were scrambling either to find their next job or to show their extra value to their employer to avoid being the next one to be let go.

Those who were finding success attributed their career stability to their networks.  All the news outlets were running stories about the power of networking, and the topic was considered anything but "fluffy".  While I had not had years of experience as a speaker, my take on how to make, grow, and keep your business relationships touched the problem faced by so many people.  Associations who were hungry to provide real value to their members hired me to present and I created win / win relationships with several organizations that have continued to work with me or refer me to this day.

Over the last two years I have again begun to see the eye rolls from meeting planners (and more so from the conference committee members) about the topic of connecting with people.  The reality is in our busy and tech crazed business world the need to establish long-term and mutually-beneficial relationships is more important that ever, but in a strong economy people do not see the immediate need to connect. 

Yet we live in very uncertain times.  While the stock market and job numbers are showing strong gains, there is little trust in what is ahead.  The division in our society over the current state of affairs in Washington DC (and the world) leaves our economy vulnerable, and people are talking about when the bottom may again fall out.  

If people are worried about the economy, they should be taking steps to recession-proof their careers now.  Too many of us (myself included) did not adequately understand what 2008 / 2009 was going to be like and how long it would take us to regain our previous income levels. Conversations these days are often full of questions about what is coming, but I am not seeing many people actively making plans to be ready for the less favorable economic possibilities. 

All opportunities come from people and there is nothing better to ensure that you will bounce back in the face of adversity than having established a network of people who will be there to help out in good times and bad.  The problem is that our social media crazed world has lead people to think they have more powerful connections than they really do.  A like, link, share, or follow means nothing if there is not a real relationship behind it.

Earlier this year I spoke at a conference of successful business leaders who were among the most "self confident" people I have worked with in my career (read that as: nice, successful, and arrogant).  While my presentation went fine, a few of them complained to the organizer that my focus on the importance of connecting with people was "old fashioned" and "dated".  They voiced their belief that this was not top of the list to take their companies to the next level. My belief is that when you choose people you always find victories, especially over the long run.  When I think about the business sector where these CEOs operate, they will be among the hardest hit if their is a correction in the economy.  To lessen the importance of the relationship side of growing a business will leave many of them struggling or bankrupt.  

Everyone is vulnerable to the possibility of a stall (or fall) in the economy, and business leaders and associations should be exploring what is next. Cultivating a culture of connecting is not only good for today, but will help prepare everyone for any bumps in the road.  

Choose people everyday, as there may be a time when you need them to help you.  When the economy stalls is not the time to start networking.  

Have A Great Day

thom singer 

Sunday, August 06, 2017

EmCee Role Must Evolve With The Changing Meetings Industry


I will admit, not all professional speakers like being the Master of Ceremonies for a conference or other live event.  Speaking and hosting are two very different skills, and the amount of time and effort that has to go into being the MC of a multi-day event does not equal the value in the amount paid for the services.  Keynotes pay more when you look at the "per hour rate".  

Plus the greatest skill many speakers possess is how quickly they can clear out of the conference after they finish their on-stage talk.  Too few stick around and chat with the attendees.  An EmCee has to be "on" not just up front in the general session, but in the hallways, at coffee breaks, during meals, at happy hour, etc...

I like serving in the role of EmCee.  I like it a lot, and it is a growing part of my business. It is especially cool when coupled with a keynote and my "Conference Catalyst" program, as I know in these combined roles I can help set the tone for the whole event.  It is a big responsibility, but it matters to the success of a convention.

Over the years my approach to being EmCee has morphed. With all the changes in the meetings industry I am undertaking the most intense effort of study and content curation of my decade long career.  Last year I wrote a one-man show as part of an exercise in storytelling (which spun out my new keynote "The Paradox of Potential") and this week I am taking my first workshop in Stand Up Comedy.  While I am not looking to create a comedy routine, there is much I can learn from comics that will serve my audiences in the future.

A conference is no longer a series of presentations.  It is a show, but most people who speak at events are not yet aware of these showtime expectations of the modern audience.  Thus, the EmCee must become the thread that runs both personality and audience engagement throughout all aspects of the agenda.

Becoming an astute observer becomes more important than ever for the master of ceremonies.  To identify the core learning objectives in the general sessions and some of the featured break-out sessions is paramount to the success of the event host.  "Content Weaving" and "Summation" are becoming what separates the professional from some random board member or employee who fills the host role. 

As with any new undertaking, the commitment to the long-term is my biggest focus.  There is too much a stake to imagine my fresh path will be enough for the avalanche of changes that are impacting the business side of meetings.  Yet is is somehow exciting to know that what got me to this point in my career is not what till take me to the next level. To stay relevant we all must keep learning.

Meeting organizers all have different opinions as to what is important for a successful meeting, and some see a master of ceremonies as just an extra expense. But the most innovative in the business are telling me that hiring 'the right EmCee' (not just anyone) is now becoming a fresh priority and an area they are giving more value in the budgeting process.  Having a solid host means they do not have to worry about every detail while also having to manage an EmCee who is not experienced in the planning and execution of a conference.  

I foresee that I will be working in the meetings business for the next 15 years, and it is clear that more changes are coming. I expect the role of EmCee to grow, thus I am working hard to expand my offerings.  Stand Up and Improve classes are just a part of it.  I need to crystallize my skills at summarizing events and observing what is impacting the culture of the conference (and beyond). 

Meetings are a combination of learning and human engagement, and I am well suited to serve audiences who care about both while also living the story of the experience.  

Have A Great Day.

thom singer

Wednesday, August 02, 2017

Hire a Professional Master of Ceremonies

6 Reasons to hire a professional master of ceremonies for your next event.  When you make your attendees a priority you realize the investment in an EmCee is minimal compared to the impact on your event experience.

Hear episode 278 of the "Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do" podcast.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Become A Podcast Guest - It is great way to grow your business!!!


Recently I heard about a guest on a podcast who in less than 48 hours received 12 new inbound inquiries, had nine enrollment conversations and closed three $30,000 sales… that’s $90,000 in revenue… from appearing on just ONE show!
Honestly, I was stunned. I had no idea appearing on podcasts could generate so many leads, conversations and cash.
I don’t know about you, but I’ve been looking for a new way to get the word out about my products, programs and services as Facebook ads are getting way too expensive, fewer people are opening my emails and I’m tired of being on the road conducting speaking gigs.
I’ve seriously given thought to trying to get booked on a few podcasts, but I wasn’t really sure how to identify who the players are or how to contact them.
That is, until… my friend Steve Olsher sent me a free 'Preview' edition of his Ultimate Directory of Powerful Podcasters, Big-Time Bloggers & Social Media Stars.
Steve’s Directory provides you with the names, photos, bios, “area of focus,” email addresses and marketing reach scores for the most powerful digital influencers anywhere. In other words, he’s done ALL of the work for you.
For the next 48 hours, you can grab a FREE 'Preview' copy of the Directory HERE 
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The Directory is an incredible resource. I’m sure it took his team hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars to put it together.
If you’re a coach, author, speaker, online marketer, holistic practitioner or small business owner, I highly recommend grabbing a 'Preview' copy of the Directory while you can.
These influencers are always on the hunt for interesting guests like YOU to put in front of their large followings. Just imagine what being featured on the right high-visibility platform could do for you overnight.
Take a moment & download your FREE 'Preview' copy of The Ultimate Directory HERE >>> https://ar117.isrefer.com/go/Directory/thomsinger/
You’ll be glad you did.
Have A Great Day
thom singer
P.S. When you grab the ‘Preview’ edition of the Directory, you’ll also get instant access to Steve’s free video training series, ‘Profiting From Podcasts’ which teaches you his proven process for getting booked on the world’s leading shows and generating MASSIVE visibility… at NO cost. And, you’ll also have an opportunity to pick up the ENTIRE Directorywhich contains detailed contact information for all 240 new media influencers for 96% off the normal price!
Get Instant Access HERE >>>  https://ar117.isrefer.com/go/Directory/thomsinger/

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Support Your Industry. Grow Your Pie.

"In a dark time, the eye begins to see"- Cavett Robert
I have seen dark times, and they opened me up to be ready to recognize success.  I have seen bright times and I have enjoyed the warmth of growing my business and supporting my industry.  

I am shocked when others find ways to blacken the sunshine that is illuminating the faces of others.  Why must people throw stones when someone else is rising high?  I am excited about the path I am blazing, but I am also becoming aware of how people behave in selfish ways.    It confuses me, but somebody always takes a shot at those who are excelling. 

This week I attended my 9th annual convention of the National Speakers Association.  Influence 2017 left me inspired for what is ahead for me in the next year. In my time as a member of this organization I have learned so much from the other speakers I have known (and those legends I did not have the honor of knowing).  Each time I attend I come home fired up to do more.

When Cavett Robert founded the National Speakers Association over 40 years ago he told other speakers “Don’t worry about how we divide up the pie, there is enough for everybody! Let’s just build a bigger pie.”  Too many get jealous of others and want to keep them from rising. Yet I believe in Cavett's theory of a bigger pie.  It is paramount to my core thoughts about the speaking business (and the meetings business). I want to see everyone build a bigger pie.  I get upset when I see those who undermine fabric of the pie growth speakers. 

NSA has become a beacon of my success.  When I meet people who want to become professional speakers, I encourage them to attend as many events (local and national) as they can.  But not many get engaged.  I hear many speaking "gurus" who sell services to those who want to speak talk down participation (as clearly they want to sell the information to those who want to make a living in this business), but I never could have found any success without my being engaged in NSA.

When I speak to audiences I always tell them that no matter what industry they are part of, they need to become active in their industry association.  I am shocked how many associations do not champion the cause of associations.  None of us can grow unless we all are on board to expand.

I am shocked by people who do not support their industries.  It is so much easier to grow your industry's pie than to constantly chip away at the foundation of your peers.  I did not know Cavett Robert, but I am sure he smiles at the speakers who have followed after him to expand our boundaries.  Those who support the industry and grow the pie are the legacy he left behind.  I strive to do my little part to add to that legacy.  I look up and smile thinking of him.  I am thankful he founded the NSA.

What do you do to add to the legacy of your industry?  If you cannot answer that I challenge you to do something. Anything.  No matter how small.  It all adds up.  

And do you know who founded your industry association?  You are their legacy... learn their story. 

Have A Great Day

thom singer



Thursday, June 22, 2017

The World is Changing - And So Will Your Job

There are many changes happening in the business world.  I am not sure I grasp what all of it means, and I am trying to not have my head in the sand.  The small things matter, but can easily be overlooked.

How people will earn their living is going to be disrupted and more and more people will become self-employed consultants.  Many will thrive in this environment, but having worked as a solopreneur for nearly a decade, I am also aware that some will not be prepared for all that goes with self-employment. 

My own industry, the meetings business, is going to undergo disruptions.  Speakers are going to be directly impacted, as what audiences want is different than it was just a few short years ago.  Meeting organizers are seeking ways to shake up the traditional meeting formats.  The American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) recently held a conference called XDP that was an attempt at redesigning production and participation at a live event. 

Speakers need to be more interactive, as audiences of today appreciate being involved in the presentation.  Speech times are also shorter, so to really connect with people the speaker must have wicked good presentation skills.  Content has to be stronger, but content alone belongs in a white paper, not on stage.  The mix necessary to survive as a speaker will start to become clear in the next few years, and the trick for me (and my peers) is to be open to changing up topics and how we engage while on stage and off stage.

No matter what you do for a living, you need to be looking for what is happening in your industry and how the "new-new" will impact how you do your job. The world is changing, and I fear many will be left behind.  The baby boomers will most likely not be impacted too much, but those of us who are under age 55 need to be ready for some interesting times in the next 25 years.  

I have no answers, but I clearly see the questions.  I am optimistic that I will figure out a way to navigate the future, but I am worried that it will not be easy.  

Have A Great Day

thom singer